8.08.2013

The Cusp of Summer and a Scorched Lawn

Purple Basil
The cusp of summer is upon us again in Southern Canada. With it has arrived the usual high soaring temperatures, very little precipitation and the dry, gusty winds of summer. These three factors combined can be extremely damaging, and even fatal, to green areas of the yard, garden, or newly introduced plant material in the region. As I quickly learn the vast differences between growing in a cold, mountainous climate and the sweltering desert heat of the valley bottom, my garden has overcome me (in the best of ways, of course…).

The weeds are in no short supply, of course. The hot pepper plants and corn are almost at eye level. My snap peas and radishes are long gone. Mystery plants have popped up here and there over the season, and the welcomed have simply become part of the landscape. The lawn… well, the poor lawn. I have tried my best to keep it green without straying from my “low consumption” water behaviors. Sadly, some areas of the yard have definitely suffered. These will be my first areas of attack for the new landscape installs. This means new raised beds, more edible plant material, rock, mulching, and a few new trees and shrubs for next year. 

This year is a learning experience and a great chance to plan out exactly, the best way to landscape the yard and plant the gardens. I look forward to the gardens of next year and transforming my high maintenance lawns into a manageable, low maintenance, dry land yard design.

For more information on low impact landscaping, plant selection and gardening, follow the article link to:

Smart landscaping ideas for desert climates.